Seven Steps to Help Senior Citizens Age Well

treatment for senior citizen

When you have high blood pressure, also called hypertension, you probably won’t feel it. Though common, senior citizens with this illness may not understand because the signs of elevated blood pressure are invisible and painless, but it may result in strokes, cardiovascular disease, To avoid these severe complications senior citizens should know about how to prevent and treat hypertension.

Normal blood pressure is defined as a systolic pressure (top number) that is less than 120 and a diastolic pressure (bottom number) that is less than 80-for instance, 119 over 79. Prehypertension is a state where you are at risk for developing hypertension and is defined as a systolic pressure between 120 and 139 or diastolic pressure between 80 and 89. High blood pressure is defined as a blood pressure of 140 over 90 or higher at two unique checkups.

There are a variety of measures senior citizens can take to prevent developing hypertension. Those responsible for caring for the elderly should help to encourage senior citizens to develop and maintain these healthy practices, some of which are listed below: Being overweight puts you at a higher risk for hypertension. You can decrease your blood pressure with moderate exercise, but you need to speak with your doctor before beginning a new workout program.

Eat a healthy diet with several fruits, veggies, whole grains, and low-fat dairy foods. Eating a diet rich in these foods can lower blood pressure. Fruits and vegetables have a great deal of potassium, which can be important to have in your diet. Drinking too much alcohol may have adverse effects on blood pressure.

Generally speaking, men should have no more than two drinks each day, and women should have no more than 1 drink every day. If lifestyle changes alone are not significantly lowering your blood pressure, your physician may prescribe drugs to do so. Cholesterol is a waxy, fat-like substance produced within the body. Your body needs some cholesterol, but too much it on your blood has the potential to clog arteries, contributing to a risk of cardiovascular disease or stroke, both of There are two sorts of cholesterol, high-density lipoproteins (HDL) and low-density lipoproteins (LDL).

HDL is”good” cholesterol which transports cholesterol into your liver to be excreted, thus keeping it away from the arteries. LDL, the”bad” cholesterol, contributes to a buildup of cholesterol in the walls of the arteries. The more LDL you have, the greater your chance of developing coronary heart disease. To reduce your levels of LDL and increase HDL, it’s important to eat a healthy diet and get a moderate amount of exercise. If that is not sufficient to reduce your cholesterol, there are a few medications available.

This is a technique that contains a cholesterol-lowering diet, exercise, and weight control, and it is for anyone whose LDL is above the goal set by their physician. If drugs must decrease your cholesterol, they’ll be in conjunction with TLC to reduce your level of LDL. Studies show that being overweight increase the risk of several diseases in senior citizens, such as type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, cardiovascular disease, stroke, some kinds of cancer, sleep Losing as little as 5 to 15 percent of your body weight can significantly improve your health.

A safe, healthy rate of weight loss is half a pound to 2 pounds weekly. The following is a list of ideas to keep you on track with losing weight: Keep track of everything you consume in a food journal. Create a grocery list and purchase only what is on the list. Try to shop only when you are not hungry. Store food where you can’t immediately see it upon entering the kitchen. Eat smaller portions, and at restaurants, eat half of your meal and pack up the rest for later.

Establish healthy, realistic goals for weight loss (including a realistic deadline ). Workout a diet and exercise program with your physician or other health professionals involved in providing your eldercare. Burning more calories than you take in will lead to weight loss. Usually, senior citizens have less muscle mass within the body, but strength exercises can help restore strength and muscle mass, often rather fast.

To get started on a fitness plan, speak with your physician or other health professionals supplying your eldercare about what’s perfect for you. Exercising to exercising 4 to 6 times each week for 30 to 60 minutes at a time is generally a fantastic goal to set. Drinking more than the recommended amount (two drinks per day for men and one drink daily for women) may increase the risk of certain cancers in the liver, throat, esophagus, and larynx in addition to causing cirrhosis of the liver, problems with the immune system, and brain damage.

In other scenarios, irresponsible drinking may cause deaths on the road and on-the-job injuries. If you choose to drink, do so responsibly to prevent the dangers associated with heavy drinking. Be aware of and follow proven preventative steps. Senior citizens must be responsible for their own health, this includes being an active participant with your doctor and other health professionals involved in providing your eldercare.

Some preventative measures senior citizens can take are the following: Find and remain with a”medical home.” Having physicians and nurses who understand you and your family members can be quite significant, so find a”medical home” doctor or clinic and keep Knowing which vaccines are created and emerging for adults can be of great benefit to your health. Try not to dismiss them, since they are quite important for senior citizens.

The sensitive skin of senior citizens might raise sunlight-related effects, from wrinkles to particular kinds of skin cancer. Protect yourself from too much sun, and if you see changes in your skin, speak with a doctor about them. Compliance-taking the prescribed amount of medicine in the suggested time-makes the medications you take the best. As you get older, being proactive about your health means looking for information about ways to stay healthy. You can accomplish this by frequently visiting websites like www.medlineplus.gov for trusted, up-to-date information.

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